Dragons of Challon series

Dragons of Challon series
Dragons of Challon

17 November 2018

Perfect Christmas gift for you Romance Reader



Dragons of Challon

getting them in tradesize makes an impressive Christmas gift 
for your Historical Romance lover


First snow!!


First snow of winter ( and it's not really winter yet!)  We got about 1/2 of solid ice, which bowed the trees to the ground!  Fortunately, we didn't lose lights and heat.  But then we got about inch of snow, very blowing snow!  Next week is supposed to highs in the 50s.  Kentucky weather for you.


01 November 2018

It's Nano time!!!



#NaNoWriMo18  another NANO this time I am doing a novella
 "Balefire" a Dragons of Challon story
 in  One Midsummer Knight anthology out next summer.

31 October 2018

Halloween remembered....




I simply love this time of year!

Memories of my childhood press in on me.  Not of Trick or Treating, as we did not do that.  Where we lived the houses set on huge tracks of land, 20 to 100 acres or more each, so going from house-to-house would have been an all day and night project!  The mothers (and a few dads) began donating their time to turning the school into a Halloween Festival every year.  On stage in the auditorium, Mummers and Minstrels would put on a show, and the whole building was transformed into a spooky wonderland. 

At 4PM the kids, dressed in their costumes, would hurry back to school,.  There was something oddly magical about being inside the school at night, slightly taboo, vaguely sinister.  Once the classes were organized, there was a parade through the whole town.  Often, kids with ponies would ride them as part of their costumes.  The parade would wander back to the school, and then everyone went up on the stage by class, and the audience could clap for the best costumes for each homeroom.

 Before the children glimpsed the magic in the basement rooms and gymnasium, there was a turkey dinner for everyone in the school cafeteria.  Our kitchen staff was super cooks and it was always a favorite event in the village.  After that, the gym would be opened up and the awe of wonderland would unfold.  It had been decked out with hay-bales, pumpkins, crepe paper, dried cornstalks and orange and yellow lights.  There were various booths for games of chance - a cake-walk, bean bag toss, even bobbing for apples.  A band was brought in to play music.  Monster Mash was always much requested.  In one room, they had set up a projector that screened cartoons with a Halloween theme.  Another was given over to a professional Punch and Judy style puppet and marionette show.  Each year the honor fell to the eighth grade kids to create a haunted house, back in the storage rooms that were rarely used.  And boy did they!  I recall, when I was eleven, they gave me NIGHTMARES with their gruesome scenes of torture!  Bingo was held down in the far wing for those seeking quieter entertainment.  There was simply something for everyone to enjoy.  



The love at the holiday festival spun my Shoes, Shades and Faerydust short story.




PURRFect Halloween romance 

When I was 12 was one of the best ones the parents had put on.  The night was glorious. Sadly, after that it was decided that parents were too busy to bother.  They kept on with the turkey dinner and the parade, but it was never the same.  Something very precious and innocent was lost to going around begging for candy.

So this day, I will enjoy the kids coming to the door in their costumes, smile at their pleasure, yet I will feel sad they are denied the childhood magic I so enjoyed when I was their age.'




Happy All Hallow's Eve




Welcoming Halloween Morn


A gorgeous morning for Halloween...warm with a hint of rain in the air.
I feel hope rising!




My witch wreath made by Candy Thompason


A very late fall, the trees are just now turning.  Weeks late in reaching peak color.







Munchkin


Mouse


Loki



Wishing you a joyful and safe Halloween....




25 October 2018

My Favorite Time of Year


I simply love this time of year!

Memories of my childhood press in on me.  Not of Trick or Treating, as we did not do that.  Where we lived the houses set on huge tracks of land, 20 to 100 acres or more each, so going from house-to-house would have been an all day and night project!  The mothers (and a few dads) began donating their time to turning the school into a Halloween Festival every year.  On stage in the auditorium, Mummers and Minstrels would put on a show, and the whole building was transformed into a spooky wonderland. 



At 4PM the kids, dressed in their costumes, would hurry back to school,.  There was something oddly magical about being inside the school at night, slightly taboo, vaguely sinister.  Once the classes were organized, there was a parade through the whole town.  Often, kids with ponies would ride them as part of their costumes.  The parade would wander back to the school, and then everyone went up on the stage by class, and the audience could clap for the best costumes for each homeroom.



 Before the children glimpsed the magic in the basement rooms and gymnasium, there was a turkey dinner for everyone in the school cafeteria.  Our kitchen staff was super cooks and it was always a favorite event in the village.  After that, the gym would be opened up and the awe of wonderland would unfold.  It had been decked out with hay-bales, pumpkins, crepe paper, dried cornstalks and orange and yellow lights.  There were various booths for games of chance - a cake-walk, bean bag toss, even bobbing for apples.  A band was brought in to play music.  Monster Mash was always much requested.  In one room, they had set up a projector that screened cartoons with a Halloween theme.  Another was given over to a professional Punch and Judy style puppet and marionette show.  Each year the honor fell to the eighth grade kids to create a haunted house, back in the storage rooms that were rarely used.  And boy did they!  I recall, when I was eleven, they gave me NIGHTMARES with their gruesome scenes of torture!  Bingo was held down in the far wing for those seeking quieter entertainment.  There was simply something for everyone to enjoy.  



The love at the holiday festival spun my Shoes, Shades and Faerydust short story.




When I was 12 was one of the best ones the parents had put on.  The night was glorious. Sadly, after that it was decided that parents were too busy to bother.  They kept on with the turkey dinner and the parade, but it was never the same.  Something very precious and innocent was lost to going around begging for candy.



So this day, I will enjoy the kids coming to the door in their costumes, smile at their pleasure, yet I will feel sad they are denied the childhood magic I so enjoyed when I was their age.

Happy All Hallow's Eve


New look....



21 September 2018

A Welcome to Autumn's Long Nights




Welcome 
to
Autumn's First Day

Autumn's first day comes quickly, like the running of a hound 
across the moorland. 
–Scottish Adage



Equinox literally means equal night.  We are told the autumnal equinox is a day of perfect equilibrium, a cycle split neatly into twelve hours of light and twelve hours of dark.  That's not exactly true.  In lands distant from the equator, the sun can take longer to rise and set; closer to the equator, the day lasts a little more than twelve hours. The real even split between day and night doesn't occur until later in the fall.  After the autumnal equinox, the nights will get longer and the days shorter until the Yule Solstice in the Northern Hemisphere.




Depending on your spiritual path, there are many different ways you can celebrate Mabon.  Typically, the focus is on either the harvest, or the balance between light and dark.


In Medieval Times, in Britain and Europe, small children were put to work as crow-scarers.  It was their chore to dash up and down the rows in the fields, clapping blocks of wood together to frighten away birds from the precious grain until harvest.  After the Black Plague, which killed millions, villages saw a shortage of children to serve this purpose, so instead they created faggots—false men—stuffing old clothes with straw to create a body, and place a neep (turnip) or a large gourd in the place of a head, and then mounted the figures in the field.  They quickly saw this worked rather well, and even today you will find scarecrows throughout the world.




In Scotland the celebration of Alban Elued —Light of the Water— is observed at this time.  Ancient ancestors believed the setting sun begins its decent into the deep water surrounding the isles.  The male king god is merging with the goddess Annis, and their son, Prince of Light, will be summoned at Yule.



One of the decorations you might see in homes this time of year, is the Clootie Tree.  Each ribbon has the name of a person and a special blessing on them.  This is much like the Clootie wells that are through out Britain, which are sacred springs ruled by Annis, one of the oldest Celtic deities, Goddess of the Water--likely the origins for the legend of the Lady in the Lake.  Wishing welcome came from Clootie wells.  Even today, you will see rags tied to trees beside ancient and sacred wells.  It is believed if you offer a token to the goddess, and she is pleased with it, she would grant you a wish.  The rags were bits of cloth from a person often ailing, and the wish was for good health





Autumn Mead

1 Gallon Water2 1/2 lbs Honey
1 Lemon1/2 tsp Nutmeg
1 pkg Ale or Champagne yeast

Boil the water and honey. Add lemon juice and the nutmeg. Boil, skimming the foam that rises to the surface, until it stops foaming.




Let cool to room temperature, then add the yeast.

Store and ferment for 18 days.  Then bottle.  Let it age another two weeks before imbibing
Store in refrigerator or you will be sorry!!



Tha an fhoghar a 'tighinn mar a tha an solas làn...

Autumn comes, as the light ebbs...




©  Deborah Macgillivray

September 21st 2018