Dragons of Challon series

Dragons of Challon series
Dragons of Challon

26 September 2009

A Wolf in Wolf's Clothing now in KINDLE




A Wolf in Wolf's Clothing was release in KINDLE format today. So all my books, except One Snowy Knight are in this downloadable form.


  • Print Length: 303 pages
  • Publisher: Love Spell (July 28, 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002Q1YEC6

8 comments:

Jacqueline Lichtenberg said...

Reading WOLF IN WOLF'S CLOTHING now. Just finished Ann Aguirre's DOUBLEBLIND and will blog about that on Tuesday as well as keep it for my professional review column stack.

WOLF is a very interesting experiment in point of view, and the hero is dark enough that the blurb clue to the lesson he's in for is necessary.

I think I'll really enjoy watching him learn.

Jacqueline Lichtenberg
http://www.jacquelinelichtenberg.com

Deborah Macgillivray said...

Jacqueline, that was what was so much fun about Trevelyn to write. He is female fantasy, with 110% arrogance to the gill. You have to love watching them finding out the world doesn't revolve for them!

Jacqueline Lichtenberg said...

I'm still reading WOLF. Can you explain why you put the first really hot sex scene at the 1/3 point of the narrative and why it's over 10 pages long with several settings?

Since I keep writing blog posts on writing craft for the Alien Romance blog ( aliendjinnromances.blogspot.com ) questions of structure like this keep coming up.

Is this a Dorchester requirement or a pacing you find works with your readers? (and may I quote you?)

Jacqueline Lichtenberg
http://www.jacquelinelichtenberg.com

Deborah Macgillivray said...

My characters act and react within their own parameters of who they are. In my second historical, “In Her Bed”, the first sex scene happened early on, simply because the plot opens with the heroine trying to get with child in order to hold onto her fiefs in Medieval Scotland. When and how characters meet, what is driving them, gives each story its own pace. In the first book in the Sisters of Colford Hall™ series, “The Invasion of Falgannon Isle”, Desmond comes to the island with vengeance on his mind. As soon as he arrives, he falls for the magic of the heroine and her quirky island, so their romance dictated the sexual scenes be put off. In “Riding the Thunder” the second book, Jago (Trevelyn’s twin) was in a flux, knowing their seeking vengeance against the sisters was not right. Thus, it pushed the sexual encounters farther back into the book because of his conscience gnawing on him.

When I created Trev, I wanted an arrogant man, used to taking life as he wanted, and little worrying about what happened after. He was a “wolf” in the truest sense. And he wanted Raven. He would not hold back, seeing sex as a way to bind Raven to him. Instead, it bound him to her―something he didn’t count on. Raven was the most vulnerable of the sisters, less willing to take risks. She’d spent so long creating a “Tolkein” faerytale world where she was safe, secure. Her letting go so early in the relationship and allowing Trev into her bed, her life, was her taking that ultimate gamble for something very special.

So, since I am allowed to write the stories as I want, it’s the characters themselves who say how the emotions and the sexual extension of that love occur and when. I love logic. Everything has to fit the logical make up of that character, or it just doesn’t fit. It won’t ring true for the reader.

If you find anything to help you, please feel free to use quotes.

Jacqueline Lichtenberg said...

Deborah:

That is FABULOUS. I excerpted my question and your answer as the core of a post I will put up probably November 10th. Tomorrow (I post on Tuesdays on the co-blog) I have a different post to do focused around DOUBLEBLIND.

I put in links to this blog entry and the comments section. I do hope that's OK.

The blog is
http://aliendjinnromances.blogspot.com/

Jacqueline Lichtenberg
http://www.simegen.com/jl/dushau/

Deborah Macgillivray said...

thanks you for the "spotlight"

I don't teach many writing classes, because what I do so "instinctive" for my stories. I create characters, put them in a setting, have a reason for them being at this crosswords, then the characters do the rest. Pick any point in my stories, I can explain why the character is behaving in this manner. But the actual creative profession is air, faery dust and logic....lol

thanks!

Jacqueline Lichtenberg said...

You're probably one of those writers who SHOULD NOT know how they do what they do.

Don't ask a centipede how it walks!

Jacqueline Lichtenberg
http://www.jacquelinelichtenberg.com

Deborah Macgillivray said...

I think that sums it up. I know why I do it AFTER I do it. I find too much planning, outlining etc, takes the edge off the fascination with discovering the characters.

Sometimes, when I stall out in a book, I find it's "me" plotting, rather than allowing the characters just to "live". At that point, I go back to when it was "magic" was working and see where I went off course. When I go back and allow the characters to just "do", instead of me pushing them around like paper dolls, then the stall-out goes away.